Daley Doubling Down on a Losing Hand?

Jim Hanson @ BlackFive.Net, Retired Special Operations Master Sergeant, talks about the McDonald v. Chicago ruling and the Second Ammendment Foundation’s suit against Chicago on the Alyona Show.

Although forecasting a quick victory for the SAF, calling Daley’s ordinance “doubling down on a losing hand”, he’s not sure if they’ll prevail on the gun range issue. (Allowing gun ranges within the City of Chicago).

As for what the motivation of the Second Ammendment Foundation in wanting American’s to be able to exercise their rights: “If you don’t have the option to defend yourself then you’ll get shot and you’ll die.”

This So-Called “Gun Show Loophole”

Gun Show in Texas Photo by Michael mx5txPresident of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Paul Helmke, wants you to believe that there is a giant oversight in the way sales of guns are handled at gun shows.

Sure, he puts up a well-crafted misdirection in his blog “Who Would Oppose Closing the Gun Show Loophole?” (reproduced at the Huffington Post). I chose to direct you to this version because the HuffPo’s uncensored comments were eye-opening for me.

I’m certainly against gun violence. I almost fell into Helmke’s trap. I mean, “Who Would Want to Be Misled”?

The first comment on Helmke’s smoke screen:

I am curious; what, specifically, is the “gun show loophole”. What specific extant federal legislation is inapplicable exclusively at “gun shows” but applicable in any other venue?

In short, nothing.

Mr. Helmke and other anti-gun orgs are engaging in gross misrepresentation of this fact. They target gun-shows because they know it will appeal emotionally to their target audience. If gun ban orgs like the Bradys engaged in truthful, rational debate, they would be trying to regulate a “private seller” loophole, and stop misrepresenting this issue as one exclusive to gun shows.

But then they would have to explain why, if closing this “loophole” is so important, they OPPOSE non-FFL (Federal Firearms License) access to NICS (National Instant Criminal Background Check System).

If you wanted to close a loophole why only target gun shows?

Superintendent Weis Testifies at Forum on Closing National Gun Show Loophole

Today Chicago Police Superintendent Jody P. Weis testified at the Forum on Closing the Gun Show Loophole, hosted by US Representative Mike Quigley (D-IL), to express the City of Chicago’s strong support closing the gun show loophole on a national level.
“It is imperative that we close the gun show loophole by enacting a federal ban on the ability of criminals to purchase guns at gun shows,” said Superintendent Weis in testimony delivered at the Dirksen Federal Building. “As a nation, we already require criminal background checks for people who purchase firearms from a federally licensed gun dealer. Simply stated, there is no good reason that someone who wants to purchase firearms at a gun show should not undergo the same important criminal background check as someone who makes the same purchase from a dealer.” This loophole currently allows unlicensed individuals to sell firearms at gun shows without conducting criminal background checks on buyers or without any record-keeping.

In Illinois, under Mayor Richard M. Daley’s leadership, the General Assembly has already passed legislation to close the state gun show loophole. However, because the vast majority of other states have not closed their loopholes, criminals can simply go outside of Illinois and buy guns at gun shows in neighboring states without a background check, and then bring them into Illinois.
“If we are serious about keeping guns out of the hands of criminals, we must work together to close this loophole,” said Weis.

To illustrate the importance of toughening the laws that govern access to firearms, Superintendent Weis cited several examples of weapons seized by Chicago Police that were traced back to gun shows, including:

  • One of the guns used in the June 2010 shooting death of Chicago Police Officer Thomas Wortham was traced back to a gun trafficker in Englewood. The guns he trafficked were obtained from straw purchases and gun show purchases in Mississippi.
  • In May 2010 Chicago Police apprehended another individual on Chicago Park District property,
    who was in possession of a .40 caliber semi-automatic pistol. That weapon was traced back to a gun show in Crown Point, Indiana.
  • An individual who served twenty-six years in prison for first degree murder was found in possession of seven firearms, purchased from gun shows. At the time of his arrest, he had both receipts and advertising from various gun shows in Indiana.
  • In March 2010, John Bedell, who was prohibited by law from possessing guns, shot two Pentagon police officers with a gun purchased from a private seller at a Las Vegas gun show.

In Chicago, most violent crime involves firearms and the firearm of choice among criminals is a handgun. In the overwhelming majority of these cases, these crimes are committed by people who obtained these firearms illegally, and due to their criminal backgrounds, they shouldn’t have been able to have a gun in the first place. Therefore, the Superintendent pledged that the City of Chicago would continue to do everything possible to keep our streets safe for our residents, for our visitors, and for our Police Officers. Those
efforts include:

  • Seizing thousands of illegal weapons each year
  • Collecting almost 23,000 illegal weapons due to the City’s gun turn-in program
  • Advocating for common sense gun laws in Springfield and in Washington D.C. to make
    Chicago neighborhoods safer
  • Working with the Illinois General Assembly to adopt House Joint Resolution 51 which created
    the Interstate Gun Trafficking Task Force within the Illinois State Police in October 2009.
  • Working with the Congress to enact reasonable federal gun laws such as HB 2324 “We need laws that protect the rights of law abiding residents to purchase guns but also make it more difficult for criminals to obtain guns,” commented Weis.

A Clean Gun Is a Happy Gun

And a functional gun too. Be sure to keep your firearms clean so they perform flawlessly. Whatever the purpose is. Recreation or home defense, you don’t want a dirty gun.

How Often Should You Clean Your Gun?

We all know that firearms require maintenance and cleaning, but how often should you clean your firearms? Some insist that firearms should be cleaned every time they are fired as well as every few months whether they’ve been used or not. Others insist that it is fine to leave your rifle or pistol uncleaned even after multiple trips to the range. Who’s right? The answer is that it depends on the type of firearm, what it is primarily used for, and what ammunition and elements it has been exposed to.

There are some times when you should clean your gun every time immediately after use. If you are shooting corrosive ammunition, or if the firearm is exposed to water, moisture, or other damaging elements you should always clean your gun as soon as possible. Corrosive ammunition, water, salts, dust and dirt can all lead to rust, corrosion, excess wear and tear and eventually the early failure of the rifle or pistol.

For example, last week I went out hunting with my trusty Remington 700 in 30-06. It’s not a fancy rifle with a synthetic stock and factory blued barrel topped with a Nikon ProStaff 4-12×40mm scope. The weather was cold and damp, and I didn’t see any of the wild hogs I was hunting for, but it was rainy and drizzling lightly off and on so, even though I didn’t fire a shot, I still cleaned my rifle when I got home. Why? Moisture in the barrel could lead to pitting and premature barrel wear. I also made sure to run a lightly oiled cloth between the barrel and the stock bed to clear out any trapped moisture or dirt and oil the barrel in that ares as well.

“But,” you say “I’ve got a stainless steel barrel and receiver. I don’t need to worry about moisture.” To a certain extent, that is true. Stainless steel components do help slow down corrosion and the effects of the elements that cause it, but such parts are more susceptible to excess wear from dirt, dust, and fouling. Stainless steel is softer than other steel used in firearms and as such can experience faster wear.

If you’ve got a gun that is only used for plinking, target clays, or punching holes in paper, it’s probably OK to let a few months and 3-4 trips to the range lapse before doing an in depth cleaning. You should still be aware that semi-automatics and rimfire firearms may begin to show performance and reliability issues with excessive fouling. My Walther G22, my favorite semiautomatic plinker, tends to run fine for about 500 rounds before it begins to have problems cycling dirty .22 rimfire ammunition. Because of this, I like to keep a bore snake, some CLP and a brush in my range bag to give the action a quick once-over should it start to hiccup. Even so, it sometimes makes it through a couple of bricks of Federal .22 LR before it sees a good scrubbing.

On the other hand, if you’re shooting a match gun or a firearm that is relied upon for personal defense, you should always keep it clean, oiled, and ready to go. As mentioned above, fouling, dirt and dust can cause reliability issues in semiautomatic firearms. Any primary defensive firearm should, in this writer’s opinion, be kept clean and well oiled at all times. Revolvers are not immune to fouling either: carbon build up on the cylinder can make a double action trigger nearly impossible to pull as the cylinder gap becomes clogged. For match guns, most semiautomatics run more accurate and more reliably when clean. Bolt action rifles on the other hand often require a fouling shot for the best consistency out of a cold bore. For this reason, it is sometimes easier to clean these rifles at the range where you can then fire a fouling shot (from non-corrosive ammunition) so that the bore is ready to go. Some ranges won’t allow you to clean a gun at the range, and that’s fine, you can clean it at home and store it without a fouling shot, just remember that your bore will need a fouling shot to prep the bore prior to competition.

Depending on how often they are used, all firearms should periodically undergo a professional detailed cleaning where the firearm is torn down and thoroughly cleaned, oiled and reassembled. How often this is necessary depends on the number of rounds fired through the gun and the role it typically is used for, but I like to detail strip and clean all of my firearms at least once a year regardless of whether or not they ever made it out of the gun safe at all. On firearms that are just being stored in a safe ambient moisture in the air, humidity, can cause some small rust spots to show up. Dessicants such as Hyskore drying silica gel will help reduce the humidity in your safe and cut down on rust caused by this moisture in the air. An annual cleaning not only makes sure that all of your guns are clean and stored properly, but also gives you the chance to inspect each firearm for problems that you may not normally notice. While you’ve got the gun broken down, look for cracks, rust and corrosion, erosion, or other signs that a part may need replacing. More than once while detail stripping my firearms I’ve found pins, springs, and other small parts that were wearing and could soon fail. By replacing them early an unexpected failure was prevented.

Always make sure to wear the proper safety gear when cleaning your firearms, and always clean in a well lit and well ventilated area. Some chemicals and solvents are dangerous and have fumes that can be unsafe to breathe. Proper eye-protection, gloves and a respirator are always recommended when working with gun cleaning chemicals.

Chicago Gun Owners, how often do you clean your gun and are there any special methods you use?

source: Cheaper than dirt